Dec
18

Digital Reading Program

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0 responses to “Digital Reading Program”

  1. Sandra Valks says:

    Long live Phonics. When I taught many years ago, that was exactly the way I broke words out! After my primary grades, I continued teaching the same basics in Grade 7 class. Good for you to get phonics back into the learning space!

  2. Debra says:

    The success of teacher generated lesson plans depends on the expertise of the teacher or on how well he/she observes the students in their daily work and knows their needs. The teacher must be creative in offering instruction that latches on to students’ interests and learning styles. The lesson plans I created when I worked in the classroom were better than the ones in the textbook and more relevant to the ways my students learned. Good topic.

  3. […] that we are aware that teacher-generated lesson plans are essentially best guess, unproven entities, in which the children …, we need to know what alternatives exist and what they have to offer. How can a teacher, tutor, […]

  4. […] The responsibility to use a better instructional design model to create lessons cannot be dumped on the person doing the teaching as a responsibility. Most of these people have never had a course in instructional design. As a result they have neither the training, the time, nor the opportunity to create, test, revise and perfect a lesson. Effective, field-tested lessons should be created by instructional designers and provided to the teacher as tools as we did with the “final ‘e’ spelling rule” in my post – “A More Effective Way to Teach Spelling”. […]

  5. Danielle says:

    What if you have a student who has speech deficits? For example, I have several students who had delays in speech as young children. They can carry on conversations, however they are still lacking in skills most kids their age have. If the average person can speak 200 words per minute and these kids can’t, wouldn’t that mean they wouldn’t be able to reach the 200 wpm goal? So what goal would you set for them?

    • Richard McManus says:

      What we do is set a plain “free/say” goal for the student, and we build up their ability to talk. We use “count as high as you can for 10 seconds” and an exercise called Rapid Automatic Naming to build up the student’s ability to talk more quickly. You are absolutely right–if a student cannot TALK at 200 to 250 wpm it is NOT likely he or she can read at that speed. BUT they can learn to do both. Practice in as many fluency building exercises as possible can make a huge and rapid difference.

      We have resorted to having students SING a favorite song at a high speed if we can’t find anything else. Beware of AC/DC songs if you try this approach!

  6. Karen Mahon says:

    Great article, Michael! My only regret is that you don’t use WordPress, so I can’t repost this on my blog!! Well done!

  7. Kent Johnson says:

    Excellent, Michael! I’m going to send this on to the SCS Newsletter folks so they can contact you about alerting members to read this.

    • Kent,
      Congratulations on your new book. I would be happy to buy a copy and review it on my website. Thanks for forwarding the info to the SCS. Anything I write is eleigible for reposting if they feel it has merit.
      Hugs,
      Michael

  8. Shiloh says:

    Michael, could we repost an excerpt of this blog post in the Standard Celeration Society Newsletter, with a link to the full text?

  9. […] my last blog, I promised that I would provide some information on the frequencies of some typical human […]

  10. Sandy says:

    Where can we get such a chart? Or do we have to make our own?

    • Sandy,
      The Standard Celeration (Daily) chart is sold by Behavior Research Co in Lawrence Kansas. They have a website from which you can order. They accept orders by fax only. Charts come in reams of 500 and are about $50.00 per ream plus shipping and handling. We are going to begin to resell smaller numbers of charts because most individuals do not need 500 of them We are selling sets of 50 charts fpr 10.95 plus shipping and handling.
      I hope that helps to answer your question. Call me at 1-877-368-1513 if you need more information.
      Regards,
      Michael

  11. Danielle says:

    This really is the best way to measure how well a student is doing. It gives the student instant feedback and they can see how well they are improving. My students are motivated by watching their own progress. It makes them want to work harder.

  12. […] Part 3: Common Conventions of using the Standard Celeration Chart […]

  13. John Smale says:

    Great blog Michael. Very informative and interesting.

    • John,
      Thank you for commenting on my blog. It is significant that someone who knows me and my work takes the time to read and remark on it. Not many people actually take the opportunity to provide feedback, good, bad or indifferent to an author. I really appreciate your doing so.
      Michael

  14. Michael Maloney says:

    Sandy,
    To get Standard Celeration Charts, you contact Behavior Research Co at http://www.behaviorresearchco.org and order them on their website. They sell many Precision Teaching-related products, so make sure that you specify the Daily per minute -Standard Celeration Chart-DPmin -12EC. I would suggest that you start with a package of 50.

  15. Nikki Dailey says:

    Wonderful Job! This is a great way to show the individual progress of a child and their behaviour. ~Nikki

  16. Michael Maloney says:

    Danielle,
    I’m sure a number of parents, teachers and therapists will begin adopting SAFMEDS after reading your blog. Thanks for contributing.
    Michael Maloney

  17. Danielle says:

    That is fantastic how fast he is moving through the program. This is possible because the program is builds on previous learned material and follows a logical and natural progression of learning, the student must be fluent before moving on and the dedication of the tutors. Way to go tutors!

  18. […] In   «  Surviving on SAFMEDS  »Precision Teaching Case Study Series Part 2 of 5: Teaching Word Lists to a Developmen…   Feb […]

  19. […] In   «  Precision Teaching Case Study Series Part 4 of 5: Teaching Word Meanings to a Developm…   Mar […]

  20. […] a bit of training, some communication about what the data is telling us and we are in business. Let me know if you are interested. Share this:EmailFacebookTwitterGoogle […]

  21. Andrew says:

    Powerful and well-documented, Michael. A real call to educational arms!

    You bring up ‘culture’, and I think that’s key. Real training on statistical data was pretty much absent from my experience of teacher’s college. If anything, the qualitative/anecdotal was stressed over the quantitative.

    The education system, in general, seems to trust watered down versions of precision teaching – scores on math fact quizzes or the occasional reading check-in. Do we need more scientists-that-are-good-teachers, hungry for daily data and measures? And how can we motivate more of these types of people to go into education?

  22. […] In   «  Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)  »What Are Behavioral Objectives? Part 2 of 5: The Scope and Sequence Chart   Apr […]

  23. […] In   «  What Are Behavioral Objectives? Part 1 of 5: An Overview  »What Are Behavioral Objectives? Part 3 of 5: Gantt Charts   Apr […]

  24. […] In   «  What Are Behavioral Objectives? Part 1 of 5: An Overview  »What Are Behavioral Objectives? Part 3 of 5: Gantt Charts   Apr […]

  25. […] In   «  What Are Behavioral Objectives? Part 2 of 5: The Scope and Sequence Chart   Apr […]

  26. […] visit Michael Maloney’s site for more information about both his homeschooling program and his training center. The site offers […]

  27. […] visit Michael Maloney’s site for more information about both his homeschooling program and his training center. The site offers […]

  28. Nikki Dailey says:

    I love using this sheet. It allows the student to set their own goals, monitor their progress as well as be accountable for what they do.

  29. […] Behavior Management: Praise and Encouragement – 91 Ways to Say “Good for You”. This is a series of seven blogs to help teachers, parents and therapists bring students under instructional control so that teaching can occur …  […]

  30. […]   «  What Are Behavioral Objectives? Part 5 of 5: Why This System Works  »Behavior Management: Bribes or Rewards – The Fundamental Question   May […]

  31. […] Behavior Management: Praise and Encouragement […]

  32. […] Behavior Management: Bribes or Rewards – The Fundamental Question […]

  33. […] In   «  Behavior Management: Bribes or Rewards – The Fundamental Question  »Behavior Management: Activities as Reinforcers   May […]

  34. […]   «  Behavior Management: Bribes or Rewards – The Fundamental Question  »Behavior Management: Activities as Reinforcers   May […]

  35. […] In   «  Behavior Management: An Overview  »Behavior Management: Praise and Encouragement – 91 Ways to Say “Good for […]

  36. […] Behavior Management: Activities as Reinforcers […]

  37. […] Behavior Management: Bribes or Rewards – The Fundamental Question […]

  38. […] Behavior Management: Bribes or Rewards – The Fundamental Question […]

  39. […] Behavior Management: Praise and Encouragement […]

  40. […] Behavior Management: Activities as Reinforcers […]

  41. […] In   «  Behavior Management: Behavior Contracts   Jun […]

  42. […] Behavior Management: Bribes or Rewards – The Fundamental Question […]

  43. […] In   «  Behavior Management: Activities as Reinforcers  »The Portrait of a non-Artist as an Old Man   Jun […]

  44. […] Behavior Management: Praise and Encouragement – 91 Ways to Say “Good for You”  »Behavior Management: Point Systems for Progress   Jun […]

  45. […]   «  What Are Behavioral Objectives? Part 2 of 5: The Scope and Sequence Chart  »What Are Behavioral Objectives? Part 4 of 5: Setting Measurement Standards   Apr […]

  46. […] That way you can both see how they are progressing and areas that need improvement. We also provide Star Charts that indicate the points students have earned as they have learned. There are also Points Charts […]

  47. […] indicate the points students have earned as they have learned. There are also Points Charts and Fluency Check records which show daily results in Maloney Method […]

  48. Meaghen Shaver says:

    Hi Michael,

    Just wanted to write to say, I LOVED this fish story! You are so well written and your brilliant sense of humour comes through. I’ve been enjoying your blog all year long and always find I pick up some helpful tips for my practice.
    Keep it coming!

  49. […] Behavior Management: Activities as Reinforcers […]

  50. […] In   «  Three Secrets You Must Know About Teaching Phonics  »Helping Foster Children Improve their Reading Skills   Nov […]

  51. […] Part 3: Common Conventions of using the Standard Celeration Chart […]

  52. […] The Role of Practice in Learning: When is “Good Enough” Good Enough? […]

  53. […] The Role of Practice in Learning: Directed Practice […]

  54. […] The Role of Practice in Learning: Directed Practice […]

  55. […] The Role of Practice in Learning: When is “Good Enough” Good Enough? […]

  56. […] The Role of Practice in Learning: Independent Practice […]

  57. […] In   «  The Role of Practice in Learning: When is “Good Enough” Good Enough?  »Teaching Literacy in the Slums of Bangladesh: The Amarok Society   Jul […]

  58. […] «  New Statistics: Almost 30% of Alabama College Students Require Remedial Education  »The Role of Practice in Learning: Independent Practice   Jul […]

  59. […] The Role of Practice in Learning: Independent Practice […]

  60. Tanyss Munro says:

    This is such an interesting history of the excellent Each One Teach One programme, Michael.

    Programmes started based on pressing need and then carefully honed and tailored in a way that matches those needs, with regular feedback and performance review, are too rare. I’m sure this programme is making a big dent in functional illiteracy in your region.

    I also had not realized you were the Founding Literacy Chair – what positive change you bring with you.

  61. […] Behavior Management – Getting students to comply and work hard. […]

  62. […] Direct Instruction – Presenting concepts and operations using explicit rules, examples and non-examples to teach the student to discriminate between instances […]

  63. […] Behavioral Objectives – a road map from here to success […]

  64. […] Precision Teaching – Determining progress every day using frequency as a measure […]

  65. […] Behavior Management: Praise and Encouragement […]

  66. […] «  The Portrait of a non-Artist as an Old Man  »Behavior Management: Why it Works   Jun […]

  67. […] use to teach their students real skills. I have already posted one rule about spelling entitled “A More Effective Way to Teach Spelling”. If you have not already done so I might suggest that you read it […]

  68. Michael Maloney says:

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    « Teaching the “s”, “es” plural rule

    Nov

    04

    Outline of the events in the 2-Day Inclusion Workshop

    By Michael Maloney

    I am being contacted by individuals who want a more detailed breakdown of the workshop agenda.
    Here it is and here is what others are saying about the Maloney Method.

    From Hong Kong
    I invited Michael Maloney to assist me in establishing a classroom for autistic children in Hong Kong. I did so on the recommendation of Dr. John Partington whom I have known for a number of years. Michael set up the academic program as part of the overall classroom activities. He trained our teachers, monitored the data, and coached them to make decisions as the data indicated a need.
    The children made remarkable academic progress with the Maloney Method, including eventually have some children placed in selected regular classes. Combined with the social skills, behavioural management program, the speech and sensory integration programs, our children gained significant skills in a variety of areas. The children were also very motivated by the Maloney method and the teachers love the systematic approach. We have later established a school catering for autistic children. The school aims to provide support for autistic children with a vew to moving into regular classrooms.

    I would whole-heartedly recommend the Maloney Method as one more part of the program to provide inclusion for ASD children.
    Eva Hyto,
    Founder,
    Hong Kong Junior Project

    From Canada

    The Behaviour Institute serves children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and we frequently work on improving their academic skills in areas such as reading, spelling, and math. There is no better approach to do this than the Maloney Method, I have Michael for over 40 years and his knowledge about how to get gains in academic skills is unmatched. We use Michael’s programs to achieve outcomes for the clients we serve.

    Joel Hundert Ph.D., C.Psych., BACB-D
    Director,
    Behaviour Institute

    ———–

    Day 1 – 8:30-9:00 – Coffee/Juice/Water
    9:00 – 10:00 – Introduction to the Maloney Method (History, Research and Rationale)
    10:00 – 10:30 – Learning to Use Precision Teaching, setting standards, creating change, measuring results in a minute a day, making better decisions sooner.
    10:30 – 10:45 – Refreshment Break
    10:45 – 11:30 – Sari – Others Aspects of Inclusion to Consider
    11:30 – !2:00 – Q & A
    12:00 – 12:30 – Lunch
    12:30 – 2:30 – Learning Direct Instruction Skills – More than chatter, getting to where the rubber hits the road and learning how to do it.
    2:30 – 2:45 – Refreshment Break
    2:45 – 4:00 – Continuing to learn DI & PT skills
    4:00 – 6:00 – Personal appointment with Michael (20 minutes/per person) 6 spots available – book early

    Day 2 – 8:30-9:00 – Coffee/Juice/Water
    9:00 – 10:20 – Review and Q & A regarding Maloney Method (History, Research and Rationale)
    10:00 – 10:30 – Learning More about Precision Teaching and especially about your own behavior.
    10:30 – 10:45 – Refreshment Break
    10:45 – 11:30 – Application of Maloney Method to other subjects: language, math, spelling, higher order thinking skills, etc.
    11:30 – !2:00 – Q & A
    12:00 – 12:30 – Lunch
    12:30 – 2:30 – Learning and practicing More Direct Instruction Skills –
    2:30 – 2:45 – Refreshment Break
    2:45 – 4:00 – Designing a comprehensive overall systematic plan for intervention that will allow inclusion for your students.
    4:00 – 6:00 Personal Appointment with Michael (20 minutes/person)

    A Personal Note: All segments of the workshop will begin and end on time. I do not punish people who are prompt by making them wait for others who are tardy. I do not review for the benefit of latecomers. Be on time.

  69. Patrick Del Rosario says:

    Hi Michael, great piece! 🙂 It is certainly informative and I agree with most of the points you have presented but change is still possible. It will not be instant but gradually with the remolding of the education system, it will happen

    • Michael says:

      Patrick,
      Thanks for writing.
      I agree with you that change will come, but I expect it from a source most people would not yet consider seriously. I will reveal that source in my upcoming blog series.

  70. […] Why Our Schools Are Failing- Part 4. […]

  71. ポーター 財布

    もしあなたのマーク覚えてをおいて各分散。あなたの手と一緒に革として説得力をこめて外へ向か実行袋以内。ウルド – 粗に隋の解決ウルド – 隋服、ロック音楽スーパー スターに最適になり、アン滑走路サウンド トラックのもっとも高い予想それぞれの休日。ショッピングのため彼女の偉大な礼拝ほぼすべての都市で根本的なショッピングの場所を経験してきた。次のいくつかの本能になるアナスイ レディース巨大なファッションを抱かせます。

  72. […] Behavior Management: Bribes or Rewards – The Fundamental Question […]

  73. Moshe says:

    Do your scope and sequence charts “tie-out” to or connect to the Common CORE standards?

    • Moshe,
      We make no attempt to coordinate any of our curricula with Common Core Standards. To do so would require an enormous amount of work on our part. Common Core does not use frequency as a measure in tracking most skills. They do not use daily measurement. They are stated as learning outcomes in very general terms and are pretty much useless as a metric. There is also a lot of contention over their development and implementation. I will be surprised if they exist 5 years from now.
      We have been using frequency and fluency, measured daily for every student in every major area of curriculum for almost 50 years now. It has never failed us and has survived several major national educational initiatives, including No Child Left Behind. I am dedicated to results not to amorphous guidelines, national education policies or anything that can not produce reliable visible results within days with any student.

    • Arthur Melanson says:

      Moshe, I suspect that Common CORE standards identify the curriculum that some concerned educators (and others) desire to have students study and hopefully master. Reading Ability might be a Common CORE standard. If so, it is a worthy standard and, it is likely that you know its components. I suspect that Michael Maloney believes that Reading Ability is a major educational objective. He believes that his hierarchical scope and sequence chart is a pathway to achieving that objective based on evidence obtained through his education, his experience, and his teaching results. An answer to your question requires a Common CORE scope and sequence chart. Kindly submit such a chart for the purpose of making a comparison. Thank you for your reply.

      SEE: Mager, Robert F. “Preparing Instructional Objectives” – http://www.amazon.com/Preparing-Instructional-Objectives-Development-Instruction/dp/1879618036

  74. lwhittle says:

    Where in this site can I find an example/suggestion for keeping track of rewards with 30 students? My classroom today is very different than it used to be because of the larger number of students who have learning and/or emotional disabilities. Where I used to be strong in my classroom management, I feel I’m losing my grip on my ability to positively shape behaviors and minimize unwanted behaviors. I feel stretched in too many different directions almost every day. Teaching small groups at a time has gone away because students have lost their independent learning skills. I would like to teach them how to find those skills again while creating a positive environment for all of us.

  75. […] What Are Behavioral Objectives? Part 5 of 5: Why This System Works. […]

  76. Dana says:

    …if I were practicing at “grade level”… (laughs).

    Thanks; a good intro to Michael’s work, and that work should be useful to self and peers as we proceed.

    Dana
    Guild Figure Model
    NPI 165 953 4493
    Supporting/Student Member AASECT 2006-2013
    (a hat)

  77. Ion Santoso says:

    I am composing my thesis about Reading Frequency. I face the difficulty to find out the references about it. Would you please recommend me about the appropriate book about it? Please send it to my E-Mail here: isantoso89@yahoo.co.id. Thank you.

  78. Arthur Melanson says:

    Excellent Michael.

    Your wrote; “When we are teaching or learning, we always want to know if we are improving.” I agree completely. We are at odds with educators who say, “Teachers do too much testing. Testing steals time from teaching.”

    The SAFMEDS are a wonderful learning procedure. I trim a small triangle from the upper left-hand corner of each card. The student assembles the cards with the trimmed corners all at upper left. The term is always face up. (Inexpensive remedy)

    Michael, you are a scholar.

    jamelanson@aol.om

  79. Michael Maloney says:

    Arthur,
    Thanks for the encouragement and especially for the tip about clipping the one corner so the index cards are always in the correct orientation. I swear that even as I approach 75, I am still being tutored by my professional community to make our materials better. Thanks.
    Michael

  80. Starr Pink says:

    These are by far the best tips for blending that I have ever seen in my life, this is a breakthrough for my 6 y.o. dyslexic daughter, she’s so excited and we just started tonight sounding out the words without any breaks.

  81. mike says:

    I want to cite this APA but there is not enough information to make her happy.

  82. […] We’re lucky enough to know the brilliant man behind the books and method. And we’d like to introduce you. Here’s a Q & A with Michael Maloney. […]

  83. […] I shared methods and strategies. We were both trained behaviourists, but Eric was a specialist in Precision Teaching, a measurement and decision-making system created by his mentor, Ogden R. Lindsley at Kansas […]

  84. […] your song well before you start singing.” You have to know what you’re doing. (There are teaching tips on  my site to help.) Learn to use the fluency checks. They are simple frequency counts of very […]

  85. Google says:

    Google

    Sites of interest we have a link to.

 
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